In the media

02 18 15
American Association of State Colleges and Universities
Let’s pretend for a moment that the arguments of the so-called reformers are right: universities are about to face disruptive innovation from a disgruntled public, unhappy employers and policy makers, and new technologies. Let’s assume, moreover, that the many books that document the sad commercialization of higher education are also correct: universities are becoming more like businesses, students are becoming more like consumers, and research is becoming more like product development.
02 18 15
The Seattle Times
For the second time in three years, three Washington universities have sent more undergraduates to work overseas in the Peace Corps than any other schools of their respective sizes in the nation.
02 18 15
USA Today
The state of Washington is well on its way to becoming known for one of the nation's top producers of Peace Corps volunteers. For the second time in three years, schools in the state have been ranked for producing the most volunteers currently serving in Peace Corps in small, medium and large-sized undergraduate colleges and universities, according to annual Peace Corps rankings.
02 18 15
The Rumpus
It’s embarrassing to admit that when I arrived at Western Washington University’s Master of Arts in English program in the fall of 2001, I could count on two hands—and two hands only—the number of living, breathing writers whose work I knew intimately, whose names had found their way to the tip of my tongue. If I changed the criteria to living, breathing poets, the count dropped to one hand, and my tongue struggled to find their names.
02 17 15
The Bellingham Herald
Joel Swisher, the new director of the Institute for Energy Studies at Western Washington University, stumbled across the institute by chance after his son enrolled at Western. At the time, Swisher, 57, was living in Boulder, Colo., where he was an independent consultant and taught graduate-level courses at Stanford University on greenhouse gas mitigation and electric utility planning methods.
02 17 15
The Bellingham Herald
Dave Freeman decided to become an attorney, in part, because he knew it was work he could do even if he went blind. An Olympia native, Freeman started having problems seeing in the dark when he was about 10. By 14, he was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited disease in which the retina slowly degenerates, leading to problems with night vision, tunnel vision, and, eventually, blindness. His mother has the disease too.
02 17 15
Skagit Valley Herald
It’s a drizzly, February day, but the spirits of the elementary school students at Western Washington University’s Shannon Point Marine Center are bright as they scour the beach for signs of marine life. Some of them find limpets and barnacles, others find crawly creatures with claws that cling to their fingers as they bring them to an instructor for identification. Of course, there are also the birds that need identifying: cormorants and loons that bob in the water.
02 17 15
The Bellingham Herald
Months before Deja Fink’s son was set to begin kindergarten, she didn’t think he was ready. Her son, Patrick Mills, had never been to preschool or day care, and he had no experience being around other kids in a social setting.
02 17 15
The Bellingham Herald
When it comes to Whatcom County, nothing is more iconic than Mount Baker. At 10,781 feet it’s the third tallest mountain in the state, a snowcapped dome visible from much of the county, a constant presence, and, for some people, a sacred one.
02 17 15
The Bellingham Herald
Growing up in rural Whatcom County, Ryan Pemberton knew what it was to be hungry. His father, who lived out of state, saw Ryan once or twice a year. So young Ryan dreamed of a future in which his own children would have two parents under one roof and enough food on the table. After graduating from Nooksack Valley High School, he majored in psychology at Western Washington University, thinking he might become a counselor, and minoring in business, to boost the odds he would find a good job.