Larry Estrada

Painting by Cuban artist donated to WWU

Western Washington University students AnaMae Rood, left, and Ashley Nimocks study in Wilson Library near a painting recently donated by English professor Rosanne Kanhai in honor of her late husband, Paul Goslow. The painting, "El Secreto del Pez," is by Cuban artist Salvador Gonzalez Escalona. Photo by Dylan Koutsky | Communications and Marketing intern

English professor Rosanne Kanhai speaks at a ceremony to unveil the painting she donated to the university in honor of her late husband, Paul Gaslow. Flanking Kanhai are James Loucky, a professor of anthropology at WWU (on Kanhai's right), and Larry Estrada, an associate professor at Western's Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies (on Kanhai's left). Photo by Matthew Anderson | WWU Communications and Marketing

English professor Rosanne Kanhai poses next to the painting she donated to the university in honor of her late husband, Paul Gaslow. Photo by Matthew Anderson | WWU Communications and Marketing

Sarah Clark-Langager, director of the Western Gallery, speaks at a ceremony to unveil a painting by Cuban artist Salvador Gonzalez Escalona, donated by to Western by English professor Rosanne Kanhai. Photo by Matthew Anderson | WWU Communications and Marketing

Matthew Anderson
Western Today editor

A painting by famed Cuban artist Salvador Gonzalez Escalona now hangs in Wilson Library, the gift of English professor Rosanne Kanhai in honor of her late husband, Paul Goslow. Goslow, a Western alumnus, purchased the painting in 2004 when he accompanied Kanhai and a group of WWU students to Cuba.

Goslow always was a bigger fan of the painting than Kanhai, she says, and she was even somewhat intimidated by the painting's foreboding qualities.


Estrada to talk at noon today on issues in the Dominican Republic

Western Today staff

Larry Estrada, a faculty member from Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, will talk at noon today on "Statelessness, Race and Identity in the Dominican Republic." Estrada's presentation is part of the Center for International Studies' International Studies Lecture Series.


Roberto Maestas, leading advocate for social justice, dies at 72

The Seattle Times
Roberto Maestas used to say that what made his long partnership with three other civil-rights advocates work was that they all loved people unconditionally. For nearly four decades, that characteristic allowed Mr. Maestas to fight hard for causes that mattered to him while maintaining a sense of humor and even having fun.
Why this is relevant: 

Roberto Maestas was a close friend to WWU. Larry Estrada, an associate professor at Fairhaven College and director of American Cultural Studies, says "He was especially close to Fairhaven College where on a number of occasions he was featured in our programs, lecturing in classes and most of all always welcoming our students for internships, course excursions and professional positions within El Centro De La Raza."

Ethnic Studies is Broadening, Arizona Be Damned

Color Lines
"When Arizona School Superintendent Tom Horne took to the airwaves last month lauding the state’s new ban on ethnic studies programs in public schools, it reminded me of the white girl who came up to me after a college talk to find out why the Black girls at her school didn’t like her."
Why this is relevant: 

Larry Estrada, director of the American Cultural Studies program at WWU, is quoted in this article.

New Arizona law shows battle with racism still exists

The Bellingham Herald
"Who is not from an immigrant family who came to this land of opportunity to escape war, famine, disease, poverty, oppression, etc., in their "old country"? If I saw only Native Americans out rallying against immigrants I might be a bit more intrigued than by the efforts of the strongly white majority. This is a human rights issue; it is a civil rights issue. It is about every day racism in our country and it affects each and every one of us."
Why this is relevant: 

This editorial includes a quote from Larry Estrada, director of the American Cultural Studies program at Western Washington University.

Vikings helping Haitians | Bellingham Herald

Eighteen Western Washington University students studying abroad for a semester in the Dominican Republic worked last week to pack more than 5,000 emergency care packets headed to neighboring Haiti. Each packet is designed to feed a family for a week. Western's Larry Estrada, a professor at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies who is in charge of the program in the Dominican Republic, said in a university press release that the students worked with the emergency-relief arm of the German government, GTZ, to help assemble the packets.